Illinois State Library

Illinois Center for the Book


Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  Beth Anderson  

Pen Name: 

Genre: Fiction History Non-Fiction

Audience: Children;

Born:


-- Blog -- https://bethandersonwriter.com/blog/
-- Facebook -- https://www.facebook.com/beth.anderson.33671748?fref=ts
-- Pinterest -- https://www.pinterest.com/bandersonwriter/
-- Twitter -- https://twitter.com/BAndersonWriter
-- WorldCat: -- http://www.worldcat.org/search?q=Beth++Anderson


Illinois Connection

Anderson was born in Illinois and raised in Grayslake.

Biographical and Professional Information

Beth Anderson, a former English as a Second Language teacher for over 20 years, combines her love of writing with the joys of discovery and learning in her narrative nonfiction and historical fiction picture books. She earned a B.A. in linguistics and a M. Ed. in reading.

Anderson now lives in Colorado.


Awards

Lizzie Demands a Seat!

Starred Review, Kirkus

Starred Review, Booklist

Starred Review, School Library Journal

Starred Review, Publishers Weekly

Speaking Engagements

Speaking Engagement Availability: Yes.

Selected Titles At Your Library


ISBN: 1684373999. OCLC Number:

Calkins Creek. .

An Inconvenient Alphabet: Ben Franklin & Noah Webster's Spelling Revolution
ISBN: 1534405550. OCLC Number: 1022689394

Simon & Schuster. .

Details the origins of Noah Webster's first American English dictionary and the struggles of Webster and Ben Franklin to help unify the new country through language in the 1780s.

LIzzie Demands a Seat! Elizabeth Jennings Fights for Streetcar Rights
ISBN: 1629799394. OCLC Number: 1134620715

Calkins Creek. .

One hundred years before Rosa Parks took her stand, Elizabeth Lizzie Jennings tried to board a streetcar in New York City on her way to church. Though there were plenty of empty seats, she was denied entry, assaulted, and threatened all because of her race -- even though New York was a free state at that time. Lizzie decided to fight back. She told her story, took her case to court -- where future president Chester Arthur represented her -- and won! Her victory was the first recorded in the fight for equal rights on public transportation, and Lizzie's case set a precedent.