Illinois State Library

Illinois Center for the Book


Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  Lorraine Boissoneault  

Pen Name: None

Genre: Fiction Non-Fiction

Audience: Adult;

Born:


-- Website -- http://www.lboissoneault.com/
-- Lorraine Boissoneault on WorldCat -- http://www.worldcat.org/search?q=lorraine++boissoneault+


Illinois Connection

Boissoneault lives in Chicago.

Biographical and Professional Information

Lorraine Boissoneault is a graduate of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and has written about travel, foreign policy, the environment and adventure for numerous national and regional publications, including Salon, Forbes Middle East, The Weather Channel and others.


Speaking Engagements

Speaking Engagement Availability (Yes)

Selected Titles At Your Library

The last voyageurs :
ISBN: 9781681771168. OCLC Number: 945969690

. .

aIn 1976, America's bicentennial, 24 young men set out to re-create French explorer La Salle's voyage down the entire length of the Mississippi River, abandoning their modern identities in order to live like the voyageurs of the 1600s... -- Together they set off on an eight-month, 3,300-mile expedition across the major waterways of North America. They fought strong currents on the St. Lawrence, paddled through storms on the Great Lakes, and walked over 500 miles across the frozen Midwest during one of the coldest winters of the 20th century, all while putting on performances about the history of French explorers for communities along their route. The crew had to overcome disagreements, a crisis of leadership, and near-death experiences before coming to the end of their journey. The Last Voyageurs tells the story of this American odyssey, where a group of young men discovered themselves by pretending to be French explorers.

The last voyageurs :
ISBN: 1605989762. OCLC Number: 911364588

. .

In 1976, America's bicentennial, 24 young men set out to re-create French explorer La Salle's voyage down the entire length of the Mississippi River, abandoning their modern identities in order to live like the voyageurs of the 1600s.